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team

collaborators

selected publications

sponsors

United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), New York City Department of Design and Construction (NYC-DDC)

Anna Dyson, Elizabeth Henaff, Phoebe Mankiewicz, Dita Zakova

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings America (2015)

From a Lab Scale to the Building Scale: Formaldehyde Removal by a Plant Module.

Ahu Aydogan, Anna Dyson + Lupita Montoya (2015)

Proceedings of American Association for Aerosol Research 34th Annual Conference (2015)

Physical and Biological Characterization of Porous Media for VOC Removal

Anne Wrobetz, Ahu Aydogan + Lupita Montoya (2015)

Proceedings of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting, 32d (2013)

Building-Integrated Active Modular Phytoremediation System

Anna Dyson, Ahu Aydogan, Jason Vollen, Marianne Nyman + Jeffrey Bird (2013)

Atmospheric Environment 45 (16): 2675-82 (2011)

Ahu Aydogan + Lupita D. Montoya (2011)

Academic/National Labs: UNEP, UN Habitat, Ecolibri, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), New York University (NYU), Cornell University

team

Anna Dyson, Elizabeth Henaff, Phoebe Mankiewicz, Dita Zakova

sponsors

United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), New York City Department of Design and Construction (NYC-DDC)

collaborators

Academic/National Labs: UNEP, UN Habitat, Ecolibri, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), New York University (NYU), Cornell University

Ahu Aydogan, Anna Dyson + Lupita Montoya (2015)

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings America (2015)

From a Lab Scale to the Building Scale: Formaldehyde Removal by a Plant Module.

Anne Wrobetz, Ahu Aydogan + Lupita Montoya (2015)

Proceedings of American Association for Aerosol Research 34th Annual Conference (2015)

Physical and Biological Characterization of Porous Media for VOC Removal

Anna Dyson, Ahu Aydogan, Jason Vollen, Marianne Nyman + Jeffrey Bird (2013)

Proceedings of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting, 32d (2013)

Building-Integrated Active Modular Phytoremediation System

Ahu Aydogan + Lupita D. Montoya (2011)

Atmospheric Environment 45 (16): 2675-82 (2011)

selected publications

Urbanization has led to a multitude of environmental, systemic factors that degrade both indoor and outdoor air quality, thereby adversely impacting building energy use, and human health and wellbeing. The impacts of urban development patterns on microbial diversity and interrelated human health indicators is a related and rapidly emerging area of scientific inquiry. 


Strategies for integrating large scale plant-based air handling systems into buildings are showing early promise to address air quality and related energy use and may be able to address identified challenges in built environment microbiome while offering a range of other environmental, material life cycle and energy benefits associated with an increase in urban vegetation. 


 However, the complexity of interactions between living systems and environmental control systems is such that there remain substantial gaps in the knowledge, thus continuing to impede both the value characterization and implementation of these systems.


Phytoremediation is a process through which the integration of plant-based systems treats environmental problems by removing, degrading or metabolizing toxins from the air, water, and soil, thereby rendering them harmless. Phytoremediation as a means to increase human health and well-being at many scales in urban contexts is a quickly evolving area of inquiry.

Food underpins all social organization.

How can we bring the beauty and culture of growing food back into our urban environments?

food

Renewable bio-based circular material economies in timber, post-agricultural by-products and plant-based bioremediation

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food

NOVEL

MICRO-FARMING

INFRASTRUCTURE

Yale CEA is investigating the design and deployment of building integrated vegetation systems, including the synergistic relationships between food growing, plants and the bioremediation of food and water systems.

Image: Micro-farming Integrated on the Ecological Living Module New York City

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